Baby Development Stage for Ages Twenty-Four to Thirty-Six Months

Dominique W. Brooks
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Now that your child is a two-year-old, she will continue to make big changes. Independence becomes a driving factor for your child, and it may seem as if you are constantly butting heads with each other. However, you will find yourself in awe of all of the new skills that your child is learning between 24 to 36 months.

Months 25 to 30

Growth and Development

At this stage, your child will be able to accomplish many physical tasks like standing on one foot, jumping down one step, and catching a large ball. Many toddlers can also ride a tricycle by this age. Other tasks that are often mastered at this age include teeth brushing, door opening, and hand washing, according to BabyCenter.com. Being able to do these things increases your child's sense of independence.

Independence

The main reason for the difficulty associated with the "terrible twos" is the fact that your toddler is learning to make decisions for himself. Temper tantrums may become par for the course as your little one tries to exert his will. Don't allow your child to control the situation and try to avoid situations that you know may cause tantrums. As your child develops better communications skills, tantrums may improve.

Social Interaction

Your little one is also becoming increasingly interested in playing with other children. However, she may be hesitant and unsure about how to make new friends. You can help her adjust to new playmates by giving her opportunities to meet other children. If she doesn't go to daycare or preschool, you can still find plenty of places -- like play dates -- to let her interact with children her own age. Sharing also is not necessarily a priority for your child at this age, so there may be some conflicts while playing with other children.

Intellectual Development

At two, your toddler will typically have a vocabulary between 200 and 250 words; however, frustration may still be common when your child is unable to express his feelings. Your toddler may also start understanding jokes and begin using problem-solving skills. He may also start expressing opinions and thinking about events and experiences in a more complex way.

Months 31 to 36

Growth and Development

Most three year old children can run forward pretty smoothly and walk on tiptoe. Walking upstairs using alternating feet is a skill that your child may have mastered by this point as well. Play is important in helping your child continue developing and finetuning his motor skills -- building towers by stacking blocks or playing an impromptu soccer game can be fun for both of you and can be therapeutic as well.

Social Interaction

Your child will continue to become more comfortable playing with other children while sharing with friends becomes more of a natural occurrence. This is also the time when your child may develop imaginary friends. These playmates are nothing to be worried about -- this is a normal part of development. These "friends" will disappear soon -- usually by age 6.

Intellectual Development

At this point in her intellectual development, your child should have a substantial vocabulary of over 900 words and can use 3-5 word sentences. You will find that you can carry on a simple conversation with your toddler. Naming body parts can also be a fun activity with your growing toddler. You should continue to offer your child plenty of age appropriate books, videos, and toys to stimulate her intellectual development. Your child may be interested in potty training by this time as well. If your toddler is not interested, remember to follow her clues. As your child approaches her third birthday, you can literally see her growing and maturing by leaps and bounds. Don't forget that she still needs you by her side to reassure her. Continue to provide plenty of hugs and kisses as you watch her reach each new development stage along the way. Finally, it is important to keep in mind that that every child develops at different rates. However, if you are concerned about your child's development, never hesitate to contact his or her pediatrician and share your concerns.

Baby Development Stage for Ages Twenty-Four to Thirty-Six Months